Restless Leg Syndrome

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Restless Leg Syndrome

Postby patoco » Sat Jun 10, 2006 11:07 pm

Restless Leg Syndrome

Lymphedema People

http://www.lymphedemapeople.com

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Originally posted by Midge 07/25/2005

DOES ANYONE SUFFER FROM THIS,I DONT KNOW WHETHER IT IS ONLY IN PEOPLE WITH LYMPH PROMLEMS. WHEN YOU ARE TIRED, YOUR LEGS JUMP AS THOUGH ALL THE NERVES ARE NEAR TO THE SURFACE AND YOU WANT TO STAMP YOUR FEET. IT'S HORRIBLE.
ANYONE GOT ANY TIPS
TAKE CARE ALL

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Response

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Pat

Hi Midge

When I first heard of this condition, I sure thought of lymphedema.

It's no wonder many of us would experience something like this between the swelling, nerve compression and inflammations. Interestingly it is actually classified as a neurological condition.

This is from Restlesslegs.com

Here are some symptoms:

People with Restless Legs Syndrome describe their symptoms in many ways. The International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) has categorized RLS symptoms into four major areas that must be present for diagnosis:

1.) There is a compelling urge to move the legs, usually accompanied or caused by uncomfortable and unpleasant sensations in the legs. Because the sensations that accompany RLS are unusual, patients may have a hard time describing them. They may use words like uncomfortable, creeping, itching, pulling, or creepy-crawly to describe feelings inside the leg. It is not uncommon for the sensations to spread to the arms or other body parts, in addition to the legs.

2.) The symptoms are partially or completely relieved by movement, as long as the movement continues. The urge to move is irresistible, and the only way to stop or partially relieve the sensations is to move around. However, the relief is not always complete and ends when the activity ends.

3.) The symptoms begin or worsen during periods of rest or inactivity, such as lying or sitting. This doesn't necessarily mean sleep - any prolonged period of inactivity, such as sitting in a chair in the evening, traveling by plane, train, or car, as well as sitting behind a desk or in a movie theater seat - can trigger symptoms. The more restful the position and the longer the duration, the more likely it becomes that the symptoms will occur.

4.) The symptoms are worse or only occur in the evening and at night. Morning often brings some relief to people with RLS, as symptoms occur most frequently during the early evening and overnight. Studies show RLS symptoms peak between the hours immediately after midnight and lessen in the late morning.

Some of the ways Restless Legs Syndrome patients describe their symptoms:

• Creepy-crawly

• Burning

• Tingling

• Itching

• Twitching

http://www.restlesslegs.com/di1.html

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Here are some additional resources:

Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation

http://www.rls.org/index.html

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Restlesslegs.com

http://www.restlesslegs.com/

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National Institut of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/rest ... s_legs.htm

What is Restless Legs Syndrome?

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder characterized by unpleasant sensations of the legs and an urge to move them for relief. Individuals affected with the disorder describe the sensations as pulling, drawing, crawling, wormy, boring, tingling, pins and needles, prickly, and sometimes painful sensations that are usually accompanied by an overwhelming urge to move the legs. Movement provides temporary relief from the discomfort.

Is there any treatment?

Massage and application of cold compresses may provide temporary relief. Medications such as temazepam, levodopa/carbidopa, bromocriptine, pergolide mesylate, oxycodone, propoxyphene, and codeine are effective in relieving the symptoms. Current research suggests that correction of iron deficiency may improve symptoms for some patients.

What is the prognosis?

RLS is a life-long condition for which there is no cure. Symptoms may gradually worsen with age. Because symptoms are intensified by inactivity and lying down, RLS patients often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. Left untreated, RLS causes exhaustion and fatigue, which can affect occupational performance, social activities, and family life.

What research is being done?

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and other institutes of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conduct RLS research in laboratories at the NIH and also support research through grants to major medical institutions across the country. NINDS-supported research is aimed at discovering the mechanisms responsible for motor disorders such as RLS, especially those associated with sleep changes. The goal of this research is to discover ways to prevent, diagnose, treat, and ultimately find cures for motor disorders including RLS.

Select this link to view a list of studies currently seeking patients.

http://clinicaltrials.gov/search/term=R ... 20Syndrome

Organizations

Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation
819 Second Street, SW
Rochester, MN 55902-2985
rlsfoundation@rls.org
http://www.rls.org
Tel: 507-287-6465
Fax: 507-287-6312

National Sleep Foundation
1522 K Street NW
Suite 500
Washington, DC 20005
nsf@sleepfoundation.org
http://www.sleepfoundation.org
Tel: 202-347-3471 (no public calls please)
Fax: 202-347-3472

WE MOVE (Worldwide Education & Awareness for Movement Disorders)
204 West 84th Street
New York, NY 10024
wemove@wemove.org
http://www.wemove.org
Tel: 212-875-8312
Fax: 212-875-8389

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)
P.O. Box 1968
(55 Kenosia Avenue)
Danbury, CT 06813-1968
orphan@rarediseases.org
http://www.rarediseases.org
Tel: 203-744-0100 Voice Mail 800-999-NORD (6673)
Fax: 203-798-2291

Publicaciones en Español

Síndrome de las Piernas Inquietas

Información del Síndrome de las Piernas Inquietas/Spanish-language fact sheet on Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) compiled by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

Prepared by:
Office of Communications and Public Liaison
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda, MD 20892

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/rest ... tm#What_is

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Restless Leg Syndrome

http://www.neuroland.com/sleep/restless_leg_syn.htm
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